Comics
Published November 1, 2019

See How Hell Has Evolved in 'Ghost Rider 2099' #1

Is Johnny Blaze still the King of Hell? You'll have to read to find out!

When we last saw Ghost Rider AKA Johnny Blaze, he had become the King of Hell -- would his reign last until 2099? In GHOST RIDER 2099 #1 -- which goes on sale Wednesday, December 4 -- writer Ed Brisson and artist Valerio Giangiordano have some big plans for Johnny. Are they good plans that will work out great for all parties invovled? Marvel.com asked Brisson what fans can expect from Ghost Rider 2099! (Probably not anything that will work out for everyone.)

Series editor Chris Robinson explained that GHOST RIDER 2099 stems from the story we saw in GHOST RIDER #1 – and what will happen if Johnny Blaze remains the King of Hell. It didn’t look like his reign was going to be great for everyone involved. Can you elaborate on Blaze as the King of Hell in 2099?

I don't want to spoil too much but will say that the idea of Hell evolves over time and in 2099, the Hell that Johnny's in charge of is Ghostworks -- a throwback to the original digital space in the '90s series that was the source of Ghost Rider 2099's resurrection.

Ghost Rider 2099
GHOST RIDER 2099 (2019) #1

The story description also mentions the original 2099 Ghost Rider, Kenshiro “Zero” Cochrane. Will he and Johnny Blaze be crossing paths?

Absolutely. There's definitely a bit of a passing the torch moment within the book that calls back to some fun '90s Ghost Rider stuff (both "regular" Ghost Rider and Ghost Rider 2099) that I think a lot of long-time readers will appreciate. 

Ghost Rider 2099
GHOST RIDER 2099 (2019) #1

Zero has a very “cyberpunk” story, with his consciousness being uploaded into a warbot. This was written in the mid-‘90s when the internet was in the very beginnings of entering the pop culture zeitgeist. What is it like to write a cyberpunk story about the future in today’s climate?

One of the things that I found interesting when I went back to reread all of the original Ghost Rider 2099 was that, aside from some dated references to the future, a lot of the themes of disparity of wealth and class were still as prescient today as they were back then. That's something that we pushed a little more in this one-shot, thanks to the framework put in place by Nick Spencer.

Ghost Rider 2099
GHOST RIDER 2099 (2019) #1

There's something about the idea that it's more affordable for the residents of Transverse City to live in their vehicles, in constant motion, than it is for them to put down roots, to have a home, that I find terrifying, but also not completely unrealistic. So many cities are going through housing crises right now and I've seen all sorts of creative solutions to combat the issue, usually unsustainable solutions that don't address the root problem, that this doesn't seem so terribly farfetched to me.

GHOST RIDER 2099 #1, written by Ed Brisson with art by Valerio Giangiordano, goes on sale Wednesday, December 4. Pre-order your copy now online or at your local comic shop!

Ghost Rider 2099 #1

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